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Six Common Website Mistakes With Nate Hoffelder

Six Common Website Mistakes with Nate Hoffelder

headshot of Tim Lewis

Tim Lewis, ALLi Author Member and Twitter chat host

Last week on the ALLi Twitter chat (#indieAuthorChat) we asked questions to Nate Hoffelder, founder of the Digital Reader and website expert. The ALLi Twitter chat starts 8pm UK Time on Wednesdays (that’s 3pm EST and noon Pacific Time) under the hashtag #indieAuthorChat and lasts for an hour. We ask a guest questions and they answer on Twitter. The tweets below are only the questions and answer tweets not every tweet on the chat.  The topic this week is six common website mistakes.

This wednesday we have Amanda Brown, the Homepreneur, answering questions about how best to work from home.

(Did you miss the summary of last week’s Twitter chat with Deb Cole about Video Marketing? You can find that here: Home Video Equipment with Deb Cole

Timothy Lewis

Tim Lewis is the host of the Begin Self Publishing Podcast www.beginselfpublishing.com and writes science-fiction and fantasy under the pen name Timothy Michael Lewis.

This Post Has 5 Comments
  1. Useful insights! sometimes it’s really hard to point flaws but I appreciate that you cover some common mistakes. I hope you’ll keep guiding some more insights on the same.

    Marion Coxfullstop360.com ~
    Web Designer

  2. In the response to one of the questions, you wrote this:

    Your home page needs to send a clear message about what you right, and why they should be interested. #indieAuthorChat

    It appears to me that you have made an error in your word choice. Did you really mean “what you right” or did you mean to write “what you write”? I’m sick of the errors. Put down the meth pipe and try to do a better job of editing your work.

  3. Agreed. I used to design my own websites using Dreamweaver and a little bit of source code fixing. But it became more and more complicated as CSS and dynamic content came in. When Google gave preferential treatment to mobile-friendly secure websites, I switched to Squarespace which takes care of everything but the content. It’s not perfect, but it’s a good alternative to WordPress and plug-in juggling.

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